March 29 – March 31, 2004 Joint SAAESD/NCRA Meeting Minutes

Joint SAAESD/NCRA Spring Meeting
March 29 – 31, 2004
Orange Beach, AL

Participants  |  Action Items  |  Agenda

Participants

SAAESD:
Jerry Arkin, GA
Susan Barefoot, SC
David Boethel, LA
Kira Bowen, AL
William F. Brown, FL
William H. Brown, LA
Jerry Cherry, GA
Lisa Collins, KY
D.C. Coston, OK
Nancy Cox, MS
Mary Duryea, FL
Greg Gibson, NC
Richard Guthrie, AL
Winston Hagler, NC
John Jensen, AL
Richard Jones, FL
Skip Jubb, VA
Tom Klindt, TN
Steven Leath, NC
Reuben Moore, MS
David Morrison, LA
Roland Mote, TN
Chuck Onstad, ARS
Donna Pearce, SAAESD
Jim Rakocy, VI
Rick Roeder, AR
Bob Shulstad, GA
Clarence Watson, MS
Vance Watson, MS
Greg Weidemann, AR
Bob Westerman, OK
Bob Whitson, TX
Eric Young,SAAESD

Action Items

Agenda Item S1 – Approval of Agenda, Minutes, and Interim Actions: Fall, 2003 Minutes approved (Coston/Arkin), and Interim Actions approved (Coston/Arkin).
Agenda Item S5 – S-009: Report and Budget Request: S-009 budget was approved on motion/second by Drs. Arkin/Judd.
Agenda Item S6 – Proposal for new NRSP: Action taken: Questions were raised during discussion on the new NRSP:
Is this a NRSP and if so what other ones do we have to compare this to?
What are other sources of funding?
What is being done on the web site to serve as a clearinghouse?
Is this an important NRSP?
Comments and questions will go to the NRSP Review Committee this summer.
Agenda Item S9 – SAAESD Leadership Award Presentation: Drs. William H. Brown, LSU, and Charles J. Scifres, Texas A&M were presented SAAESD Leadership Awards.
Agenda Item S11 – MRC Report: Modification in procedure for submitting a request to establish a Development Committee was approved.
Regional ED’s are still working on the common nomenclature for multistate activities and will bring the final version to the MRC for approval this summer.
Agenda Item J13 – Obesity Initiative: Daryl Lund will forward Mark Poth’s email to the SAES directors.
Agenda Item S15 – Cotton Winter Nursery Initiative: On motion/second by Cherry/Barefoot approved to contribute $12,500 each year over a five-year period. The assessment for these funds will be based on the state’s cotton acreage and collected by the ED’s office along with the regional assessment. Chuck Onstad and Mike Harrington will approach western states.
Agenda Item S17 – Sun Grains Partnership Proposal: Put this on the fall agenda and discuss at that time.
Agenda Item S19 – Resolutions Committee Report: Resolutions of appreciation were read for Drs William H. Brown, Frank E. Gilstrap and Marty J. Fuller who have left the Association. A resolution of appreciation was also read for Dr. John Jenson and staff of the Alabama Agriculture Experiment Station at Auburn University for their roles in hosting the SAAESD/NCRA Spring Meeting. The resolutions were approved by a round of applause.

 

Agenda

Monday, March 29
8:15 – 12:00 Joint Session
Time Agenda # Agenda Item – Presenter
8:15  J1 Call to Order, Welcome and Approval of Agenda – Wendy Wintersteen and Greg Weidemann
8:20 J2 ESCOP Core Committee Reports:
J2a · Communication and Marketing – Jerry Arkin, Chair
J2b · Budget and Legislative – Darrell Nelson, Chair
J2c · Science and Technology – Nancy Cox, Chair
J2d · Partnerships – Margaret Dentine and Susan Barefoot, NC and SO Reps
J2e · Planning – Virginia Clark-Johnson, Chair
J2f · Executive Committee – Ian Gray, ESCOP Chair
8:50 J3 National Institute for Agricultural Security Report – D. C. Coston
8:55 J4 CSREES Report – Ralph Otto
9:05 J5

ARS Report – Charles Onstead and Darrell Cole

9:15 J6

Collaborative Opportunities with DOE – Jim Fischer

10:00

Break

10:30 J7 NIMSS Update – Daryl Lund
10:40 J8 PIPRA Update – Nancy Cox and Bill Brown (FL)
10:50 J9

J9a

J9b

J9c

NRSP Four-Year Budget Requests (reports and clarifying questions only):
NRSP-3 – Jerry Arkin
NRSP-5 – D. C. Coston and Randy Woodson
NRSP-8 – Jerry Cherry and Margaret Dentine
11:20 J10

 

NRSP One-Year Budget Request (report and clarifying questions only):

NRSP-6 – Bob Westerman and Steve Slack

11:30 J11

J11a

J11b

J11c

NRSP Project Renewals and Five-Year Budget Requests (reports and clarifying questions only):

NRSP-1 – Bill Brown (FL) and Darrell Nelson

NRSP-4 – Mary Duryea and Gary Lemme

NRSP-7 – Garry Adams and D Robertson

12:00

Adjourn

 

 

Monday, March 29
12:00 – 1:30 Joint Lunch
1:45 – 5:00 Separate Regional Sessions
Time Agenda # Agenda Item – Presenter
1:45 Call to Order – Greg Weidemann
1:45 S1 Approval of Agenda, Minutes, and Interim Actions – Greg Weidemann
1:50 S2

S2a

S2b

S2c

NRSP Four-Year Budget Requests (discussion and vote):
NRSP-3 – Jerry Arkin
NRSP-5 – D. C. Coston
NRSP-8 – Jerry Cherry
2:20 S3 NRSP One-Year Budget Request (discussion and vote):

NRSP-6 – Bob Westerman

2:30 S4

S4a

S4b

S4c

NRSP Project Renewals and Five-Year Budget Requests (discussion and vote):

NRSP-1 – Bill Brown(FL)

NRSP-4 – Mary Duryea

            NRSP-7 – Garry Adams

3:00 Break
3:30 S5 S-009: Report and Budget Request – Jerry Arkin
3:45 S6 Proposal for new NRSP (National Initiative for Animal Environmental Stewardship) – Bill Brown (FL)
4:00 S7 Executive Director’s Report – Eric Young
4:15 S8 Southern Rural Development Center Report – Bo Beaulieu
4:45 S9 SAAESD Leadership Award Presentation – Greg Weidemann
5:00 Adjourn, dinner on your own

 

Tuesday, March 30
7:00 SAAESD Chief Operating Officers’ Breakfast Meeting
8:15 – 10:00 Separate Regional Sessions
Time Agenda # Agenda Item – Presenter
8:30 S10 Report from Chief Operating Officers Meeting – Greg Weidemann
8:45 S11 MRC Report – Bill Brown (FL)
9:00 S12 Expertise and Field Research Mapping Project – Jay Ritchie and Eric Young
9:15 S13 Open Discussion on Mulistate Collaboration and Regionalization
10:00 – 10:30 Break
10:30 – 11:30 Joint Session
Time Agenda # Agenda Item – Presenter
10:30 J12

Potential LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) project on Mississippi River basin – Daryl Lund

10:45 J13 Obesity Initiative – Daryl Lund
11:00 J14 Research highlights from Auburn – John Jensen
11:30 – 4:30 Joint Lunch and Tour
6:30 p.m. Surf and Turf Dinner for all

 

Wednesday, March 31
8:15 – 12:00 Separate Regional Sessions
Time Agenda # Agenda Item – Presenter
8:30 S14 Southern Region IPM Policy Committee Report – David Boethel
8:45 S15 Cotton Winter Nursery Initiative – Chuck Onstad and Eric Young
9:00 S16 Sun Grant Project – Tom Klindt
9:15 S17 Sun Grains Partnership Proposal – Bill Brown (LA)
9:30 S18 Southern Forest Research Partnership – Larry Biles, Executive Director
10:00 – 10:30 Break
10:30

Additional Agenda Items

11:30 S19 Resolutions Committee Report – Roland Mote and Vance Watson
11:40 S20 Announcements, Future Meeting Plans, etc. – Greg Weidemann
12:00 Adjourn
Written Report S21 Association of Southern Region Extension Directors Report – Chester Fehlis

 

Agenda Item J1.
Approval of Agenda and Minutes

Presenter: Greg Weidemann and Wendy Wintersteen

 

Background:

Wendy Wintersteen, Chair of the North Central Regional Association, and Greg Weidemann, Chair of the Southern Association of Agricultural Experiment Station Directors, called to order the joint session.

 

Action Requested: None

 

Agenda Item J2a.
Communication and Marketing Committee

Presenter: Jerry Arkin, Chair

 

Background:

The committee has been dormant since January 2002; however, with the appointment of a new Chairperson and Executive Vice Chair, the committee has been recharged this winter. They met via teleconference on February 20, 2004, and agreed on the following actions:

  1. Assist Wally Huffman with the edit and revision of the Counterfactual Study for a broader audience. Wendy Wintersteen will assist.
    2. Tom Fretz will check with Wally Huffman on how 1890s were handled in the study. A suggestion was made to segment the group since the 1890s have fewer formula funds.
    3. Review the Science Roadmap and develop strategies on how to keep it on our partners’ radar screen. Should milestones be tracked and reported on a regular basis?
    4. Initiate the process of including the Science Roadmap and the Counterfactual Study in next year’s Agriculture Exhibit on the Hill-Jerry Arkin and Tom Fretz.
    5. Continue discussion on communication vs. marketing, and the committee’s future course of actions.

The committee plans to meet again by teleconference in April.

In meeting comments:
Jerry relayed that the committee is trying to identify specifics such as what exactly to communicate, who to communicate to, and how effective the communications are on their audience. Any comments or questions should be directed to him at garkin@uga.edu.

Action Requested:  For information and discussion.

 

Agenda Item J2b.
Budget and Legislative Committee

Presenter: Darrell Nelson, Chair

Background:
FY 04 Budget: The FY 04 budget was passed in January with an overall 0.59% reduction in all CSREES line items and a 10% cut in 33 specific line items. Many of the line items were Extension programs including EFNEP. Pest control including IR-4 was cut 10%.

FY 05 Budget: Priorities for the FY 05 budget were adopted at a BAC meeting Feb 9. Priorities are (1) restore the cuts to the line items from the FY 04 budget (generally included in the President’s budget request), (2) increase funding for minority-serving institutions, (3) increase EFNEP funding above the FY 03 level by $3M, and (4) increase the NRI by 10% (from $164M to $180M). We are also committed to supporting the President’s budget when he requested an increase in support for a program. The BRT analysis reported the following: “1. Overall, USDA funding would be cut by $1.2 billion. 2. Total CSREES funding is cut by $108 million, but most of these reductions would come from congressional earmarks. 3. The National Research Initiative would increase by approximately $16 million (ten percent) over the FY 2004 enacted level. 4. Funding for many of the programs cut by 10% would be at least partially restored, including EFNEP, which would receive almost $58 million in funding under the president’s request. 5. “Homeland Security” related items would increase: the plant and animal diagnostic labs would get a $22 million increase and there is a new “higher education agrosecurity education program” line item that would be funded at $5 million. 6. IFAFS authority was captured again, thereby enabling the administration to “take credit” for $260 million in budgetary “savings.” In addition, there appear to be more “limitations” imposed on mandatory USDA programs, a move that could complicate efforts by our congressional champions to help the system as the budget/appropriations process moves forward.” The BRT called for statements from everyone citing how the cuts would impact program. Approximately 25 Experiment Stations responded with specific examples. The BRT will use these to develop materials to use in support of the budget priorities. The EDs generated approximately 40 impact statements from the multistate research portfolio, which will also be used by the BRT.

FY 06 Budget: ESCOP went through a process (including all directors and members of the B/L Committee) to identify priorities for FY 06. The priorities are posted on the ESCOP homepage under the B/L Committee. The BAC and BRT will begin working on the FY 06 budget this summer.

Farm Bill Committee: LeRoy Daugherty is chair-designate of the B/L Committee and therefore has the leadership for the Legislative part of our agenda. He will serve on the BAA Farm Bill Committee. ED Tom Fretz will serve as Executive Staff to the legislative function of our ESCOP B/L Committee. Daryl Lund will continue to serve as Executive Staff for the budget function. Jeff Armstrong, Chair of the BAA Farm Bill Committee, has called for a teleconference Thursday February 26. The EDs (Research, Extension and Academic Programs) have volunteered to serve as staff to the Farm Bill Committee.

Action Requested: None, for information only.

Agenda Item J2c.
Science and Technology Committee

Presenter: Nancy Cox, Chair

Background:
The Science and Technology Committee met on March 1, 2004 in Washington, D.C. prior to the ESCOP meeting. The following items were discussed:

  1. ESCOP has asked the S & T Committee to conduct a more in-depth, validated needs assessment of the Science Roadmap for agriculture. A subgroup was appointed to develop a plan to do this assessment and a budget, consisting of Lou Swanson (chair), Dan Rossi and Sally Rockey. Recommendations will be presented to ESCOP at the July Joint COPS meeting.
  2. ESCOP has asked the S & T Committee to recommend ways that ESCOP can assist the PIRPA initiative in it’s humanitarian mission relative to intellectual property generated by public universities. The following suggestions came from the discussion:
    – The NASULGC Council of Presidents and Council of VPs for Research should consider this issue.
    – IR4 may be a model to look at for a process to use patents on minor crops.
    – The Global Challenge Program is working to leverage genomics technology for use in the developing world. Robert Ziegler is now its director and PIPRA leadership should communicate with him and explore potential collaborations.
    The PIPRA subcommittee (Cox, Pueppke, and Brown) will explore this question and make further recommendations.
  3. An S&T Task Force to develop a white paper on the current state of knowledge concerning prions, BSE, CJD, nvCJD, and other TSE’s was proposed by Forrest Chumley, Kansas State Univ. The National Academy report on TSE that was commissioned by USDA and just completed will be examined to determine if it already accomplished what the task force would do. If not, the S&T Committee well make recommendations for membership on this task force.

In meeting comments:
Tom Payne suggested the inclusion of extension directors and recommended that they form an informational document about TSEs. David Benfield and Bert Stromberg also supported the inclusion of the Veterinary Medicine faculty.

Action Requested: None; information only.

Agenda Item J2d.
Partnership Committee

Presenter: Susan Barefoot (SC) and Margaret Dentine (WI)

Background:
The ESCOP Partnership Committee has recently been reconstituted with a full complement of Agricultural Experiment Station members. One conference call was held with the AES members to discuss the appropriateness of the committee’s current membership, charge, and scope of potential activities. Several potential activities were discussed including: working with other agencies (e.g. NIH, CDC, DHS, etc), other USDA agencies (ERS, ARS, APHIS, NASS) and working with CSREES on the new POW Guidelines and processes that will be forthcoming. The latter would necessarily require a joint effort with extension. The members agreed to poll their respective regional associations at the upcoming spring meetings for possible activities of the Partnership Committee. The Committee plans to hold another conference call in early April to discuss input from the regional association meetings and possibly a face to face meeting.

Action Requested: Suggested action items for the Committee.

 

Agenda Item J2e.
Planning Committee

Presenter: Virginia Clark-Johnson, Chair

Background:
The Planning Committee met February 23-24, 2004 in Irving, Texas.

Actions from the meeting follow:
1. Reviewed and discussed the membership list and terms of membership. A request will be made to ESCOP to review and update the list.
2. Discussed potential for involvement in the Fall 2004 meeting priority setting session.
3. Reviewed the proposed timeline for ESCOP and ESS Strategic Planning.
4. Prepared a draft of a Plan for Operationalizing the Science Roadmap. This will be reviewed once more by the committee and them submitted to the ESCOP Executive Committee for input. The goal is to have a document for approval at the July meeting.
5. Provided a report to ESCOP at the Washington, DC meeting on Tuesday, March 2, 2004.

Actions Required:
1) Review and update committee membership.
2) Determine role of committee in priority setting session at the Fall meeting.
3) Finalize a draft for review and suggestions.

Action Taken: None

Agenda Item J2f.
Executive Committee

Presenter: Ian Gray, ESCOP Chair

 

Background:

Strategic Planning: I asked the EDs to formulate a process for ESCOP to reexamine its strategic plan. A process was adopted at the February CAC teleconference and is posted with the CAC Minutes on the ESCOP homepage. Basically the process consists of two activities to be carried out over the next year. The first is for the Planning Committee to develop an operational plan for the ESS to support its programmatic priorities as identified in the Science Roadmap. This operational plan will be presented to the ESS at the fall meeting. The second activity is for the Planning Committee to develop an operational plan for ESCOP that guides its activities in support of the ESS operational plan. This operational plan will be presented to ESCOP at its November meeting for final review and adoption.
Appointments: Several appointments to various committees have been made as requested. The ESCOP Nominating Committee, chaired by Scott Angle, will be nominating two people for the BAA Policy Board and one person as ESCOP Chair-Designate (this person will be from the ARD). These nominations will be presented to ESCOP at during the July All COPs meeting.

 

N-CFAR: Based on advice from CAC, I authorized Mort Neufville to pay our $1000 membership in NCFAR for 2004 from our residual funds at NASULGC.
Counterfactual study: The Counterfactual Study Report that ESCOP authorized was received. I authorized expending up to $5000 to generate appropriate reports from the study for use in support of our federal budget requests and priorities including base funds. Tom Fretz is working with the authors of the study and the report will be presented at the fall meeting of ESS.
Civil Rights Guidelines: Following several civil rights compliance reviews at several Experiment Stations, ESCOP notified CSREES that the reviews were largely redundant with guidelines that the Experiment Station follows from our Offices of Civil Rights Compliance on our campuses. Colien is now in the process of appointing a committee (with representatives from ESCOP and ECOP) that will meet at the end of March. Margaret Dentine (WI) and Bill Trumble (NH) will be the ESCOP representatives to this committee.

 

Action Requested: None, for information only

 

Agenda Item J3.
National Institute for Agricultural Security Report

Presenter: D.C. Coston

 

Background:

NIAS is transforming to a membership organization. The response from potential members has been positive. Of the 1862 Experiment Stations, 35 have said “yes”, 9 are continuing discussions, 7 have said “no”. Of the Territories, 4 have said “yes”, 1 is continuing discussions, and 1 has not responded. From the 1890 Land Grants there has been no response. Three Extension Services have concurred to join in conjunction with their respective AES. A mailing has gone out to Extension Service Directors offering membership. Invoices have gone out to those that answered “yes”.

A first year’s annual report was prepared and distributed with the request for membership commitments. This report is proving to be a successful tool for explaining what NIAS is, who are members, and what are the activities.

At present, much of the activity is focused on implementing the grant provided by USDA entitled Developing Science-Based Site Security Guidelines. The purpose is focused on developing best management practices for handling non-select agents. During the summer, there will be a questionnaire that is distributed to all Experiment Station and ARD Directors. The results of a workshop, some site visits, and the questionnaires will be utilized to develop a draft report that will be distributed in early September. The Tuesday morning part of the SAES/ARD workshop in September will be devoted to a discussion that will lead to finalizing the report.

Action Requested: None, for information only.

 

In meeting comments:
· The extension directors are kept separate from the SAES directors as far as joining NIAS. However, if both join, there is a discount.
· DC noted that the NIAS budget would total $110,000.

Action Taken: None.

Agenda Item J4.
CSREES Report

Presenter: Ralph Otto

Background:
Larry Newell was in attendance as a Civil Rights representative. AJ Dye sent regards for his absence.

PERSONNEL CHANGES:
Anna Palmisano (apalmisano@csrees.usda.gov) – Deputy Administrator, Competitive Programs
Mary McPhail Gray (mgray@csrees.usda.gov) – Deputy Administrator, Families 4-H and Nutrition Department.

FUNDING ISSUES:
The National Research Initiative is undergoing changes, but these changes are not new. CSREES is trying to develop “national” priorities with a large inclusion of stakeholder input. Ralph said it was not in their best interest to spread the NRI across many of small programs. Contact Anna Palmisano with any concerns. CSREES is also asking for $180 million in the budget. Also, if you would like to be involved in this undertaking, contact Anna Palmisano or Mark Poth.

CSREES PORTFOLIO ANALYSIS:
Ralph mentioned that some of the directors in attendance had been contacted as panel discussion volunteers. The original strategic plan still exists. BPI (Budget and Planning Implementation) and Program Assistance Rating Tools (PARTs) are the new programs to assist with this effort. The panel will be drafting a review document.

Action Requested: None; information only.

Agenda Item J5.
ARS Report

Presenter: Charles Onstead and Darrell Cole

Background:
ARS celebrated their 50th anniversary last November (2003).

Personnel Changes:
Darrell Cole is now area director of the NC region; Andy Hammond has been re-assigned to the Western region. These two position now need to be filled.

The following ARS President’s budget information was provided:

The following notations should be associated with the above information:

  1. Anything with the notation “(HS)” is in regards to Homeland Security.
    b. There is an emphasis here on obesity
    c. A Presidential Homeland Security Directive was issued January 30, 2004 in regards to this issue. Basically, it was an executive order stating that Food and Agriculture are critical system in homeland security.

Specifically this budget topic is associated with paragraph 18 of the Directive:

The Secretary of Agriculture, in coordination with the Secretary of Homeland Security and in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, shall work with State and local governments and the private sector to develop:

  1. A National Veterinary Stockpile (NVS) containing sufficient amounts of animal vaccine, antiviral, or therapeutic products to appropriately respond to the most damaging animal diseases affecting human health and the economy and that will be capable of deployment within 24 hours of an outbreak. The NVS shall leverage where appropriate the mechanisms and infrastructure that have been developed for the management, storage and distribution of the Strategic National Stockpile.
    b. A National Plant Disease Recovery System (NPDRS) capable of responding to a high-consequence plant disease with pest control measures and the use of resistant seed varieties within a single growing season to sustain a reasonable level of production for economically important crops. The NPDRS will utilize the genetic resources contained in the US National Plant Germplasm System, as well as the scientific capabilities of the Federal-State-industry agricultural research and extension system. The NPDRS shall include emergency planning for the use of resistant seed varieties and pesticide control measures to prevent, slow, or stop the spread of a high-consequence plant disease such as wheat smut or soybean rust.

APHIS has been charged with expending the veterinary vaccine stockpile. Also, the technology associated with the current germplasm system should be used.

This directive is independent of the actual budget proposal listed above – it needs to be done even if everything else on the list is not.

  1. In particular, this topic has to do with the Agricultural Library and electronic distribution.
    b. This number removes the congressional earmarks.
    c. This number reveals the 8-9% budget reduction.

$178 million has been set aside to complete the ARS/APHIS facility.

Action Requested: None; information only.

Agenda Item J6.
Collaborative Opportunities with DOE

Presenter: Jim Fisher

Background: A New Model for University/Government Interaction

October 6, 2003

Article for NASULGC Newsline

What do colleges and universities have in common with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)? The answer is purpose.

Both NASULGC’s member institutions and the Enenrgy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs of the Department of Energy are about enhancing the quality of life of the people. Both organizations have recently invested in developing plans and roadmaps to lead these entities into the 21st century. NASULGC recently published the Kellogg Commission report on the Future of State and Land Grant Universities whereas; the EERE Office recently published its Strategic Plan and implemented reorganization. Both organizations are seeking to engage organizations with whom they can develop productive partnerships, build integrated programs that will result in interactive and responsive organizations. Both organizations seek to be engaged organizations!

Dr. James Fischer, who last served as a Dean at Clemson University, is in a unique position to forge linkages with colleges and universities and EERE. His experiences at three universities (Clemson, Michigan State and Missouri), the USDA, and his leadership roles in many organizations and associations as well as his work on establishing a vision and developing the plan for the future of land-grant universities and agriculture makes him a natural to build collaboration among universities, industry and the DOE. Appointed in June 2003 to EERE’s Board of Directors, Dr. Fischer serves as the primary advisor to the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on collaboration with universities and key related organizations such as NASULGC. The EERE Board has five members, each with a specific focus ranging from international affairs to technical and analytic integrity to the University/Education Board Seat held by Dr. Fischer.

Like its private sector counterparts, EERE Board functions include serving the Assistant Secretary by providing advice and counsel on policy and strategy issues, representing EERE with internal and external stakeholders to ensure linkages with policies and priorities and serving as an ambassador for EERE. But the existence of a Board of Directors as a governmental function is a brand new concept. While government long has relied on advisory boards for counsel, EERE, as the first federal office to engage a full-time Board of Directors, has the opportunity to set a new standard of excellence for government.

Dr. Fischer, with his focus on universities and education, is interested in developing new and innovative partnerships and educational models with universities, especially land grant universities, foundations, and the agricultural, industrial and business communities. He is committed to linking EERE activities with those of associations, organizations and agencies to strengthen current alliances, develop new partnerships for discovery and marketing opportunities for EERE products and services.

Fischer long has been an effective and enthusiastic supporter of partnerships, believing that by expanding opportunities for joint research, internships and a wide range of off-campus learning opportunities, faculty and students will be enriched by new ways of doing business. Partnerships between EERE and the academic community hold the potential for practical opportunities for the students, the university faculty and for the consumers of the research and educational products and services of the joint efforts.

While the issues addressed by EERE research are complex, opportunities abound for partnership and collaboration with the university community. And Dr. Fischer is determined to help EERE find ways to negotiate complex university structures for the maximum benefit of all partners. This interdisciplinary and integrated approach will help forge partnerships that nourish creative solutions.

EERE, along with its corporate and academic partners, can work together to help solve the vexing resource/energy problems that today limit opportunities for people around the world. Together, we can make a difference.

Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy’s

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Biomass Program – Using domestic, plant-derived resources to meet our fuel, power and chemical needs.

Building Technologies Program – Homes, schools, and businesses that use less energy, cost less to operate, and, ultimately, generate will generate as much power as they use.

Distributed Energy & Electric Reliability Program – A more reliable energy infrastructure and reduced need for power plants.

Federal Energy Management Program – Leading by example, saving energy and taxpayer dollars in federal facilities.

FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program – Less dependence on foreign oil, and eventual transition to an emissions-free, petroleum-free vehicle.

Geothermal Technologies Program – Tapping the Earth’s energy to meet our heat and power needs.

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program – Paving the way toward a hydrogen economy and net-zero carbon energy future.

Industrial Technologies Program – Boosting the productivity and competitiveness of U.S. industry through improvements in energy and environmental performance.

Solar Energy Technology Program – Utilizing the sun’s natural energy to generate electricity and provide water and space heating.

Weatherization & Intergovernmental Program – Accelerating the use of today’s best energy-efficient and renewable technologies in homes, communities, and businesses.

Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program – Harnessing America’s abundant natural resources for clean power generation to learn more, visit www.eere.energy.gov

Action Requested: None; information only. See www.eere.energy.gov for more information.

 

Agenda Item J7.
NIMSS Update

Presenter: Daryl Lund

Background:

NIMSS is currently undergoing major reconstruction. This reconstruction has not affected the usability of the current system. Programmers are using a duplicate database to construct the new NIMSS version. The planned roll-out of early 2004 was considerably delayed due to server problems and software upgrade in the OIT-UMD.

The purpose of the upgrade is to increase NIMSS’ functionality by re-designing the framework with which users are registered and assigned access. In the “new” NIMSS, menus are customized according to the user’s profile and level of authorization.

Tasks completed to date are:

  • New design of the NIMSS main page
  • Search and view functions for all multistate projects
  • Project homepages and uploading info functions
  • Proposal submission
  • Submission of participation information (Appendix E) is about 65% completed

The timetable for the remaining activities is as follows:

  • Late March – early April: Preview and training of regional system administrators
  • April 19-20: Preview of NIMSS Version 2004 to general users at the CSREES Administrative Workshop in Rhode Island
  • May 10: Roll-out of NIMSS Version 2004

Each region will preview the new version to their directors at their summer meetings. Training for station directors, advisors and project coordinators will be the responsibility of each region.

Eric Young will be taking over for Daryl Lund as Chair of the NIMSS Oversight Committee, effective immediately.

Action Requested: For information only

Agenda Item J9a.
NRSP-3

Presenter: Jerry Arkin

 

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the budget for the remaining four years of NRSP 3 (The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The renewal proposal for this NRSP was approved in 2003 as a five-year project, but only the first budget year was approved. The remaining 4-year budget for NRSP 3 can be found at http://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm.

Action Requested:

Agenda Item J9b.
NRSP-5

Presenter: D.C. Coston and Randy Woodson

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the budget for the remaining four years of NRSP 5 (National Program for Controlling Virus Diseases of Temperate Fruit Tree Crops) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The renewal proposal for this NRSP was approved in 2003 as a five-year project, but only the first budget year was approved. The remaining 4-year budget for NRSP 5 can be found at http://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm.

Action Requested:

Agenda Item J9c.
NRSP-8

Presenter: Jerry Cherry and Margaret Dentine

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the budget for the remaining four years of NRSP 8 (National Animal Genome Research Program) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The renewal proposal for this NRSP was approved in 2003 as a five-year project, but only the first budget year was approved. The remaining 4-year budget for NRSP 8 can be found at http://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm.

Action Requested:

Agenda Item J10.
NRSP One-year Budget Request

NRSP – 6

Presenter: Bob Westerman and Steve Slack

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the final year’s budget for NRSP 6 (Inter-Regional Potato Introduction Project) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

This NRSP terminates September 31, 2005 and therefore only the fifth-year budget needs to be approved. The final year’s budget for NRSP 6 can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm.


  Action Requested:

Agenda Item J11a.
NRSP-1

Presenter: Bill Brown (FL) and Darrell Nelson

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the NRSP 1 renewal proposal (Research Planning Using the Current Research Information System) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The NRSP 1 renewal proposal can be viewed at http://cipm.ncsu.edu/saaesd/guard-do/minutes/minutes.htm The 5-year budget for this NRSP can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm. Criteria for approval of an NRSP are described in the NRSP Review Form.

Action Requested:

Agenda Item J11b.
NRSP-4

Presenter: Mary Duryea and Gary Lemme

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the NRSP 4 renewal proposal (High Value Specialty Crop Pest Management) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The NRSP 4 renewal proposal can be viewed at http://cipm.ncsu.edu/saaesd/guard-do/minutes/03-04.htm The 5-year budget for this NRSP can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm. Criteria for approval of an NRSP are described in the NRSP Review Form.

Action Requested:

Agenda Item J11c.
NRSP-7

Presenter: Garry Adams and D. Robertson

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the NRSP 7 renewal proposal (A National Agricultural Program for Minor Use Animal Drugs) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The NRSP 7 renewal proposal can be viewed at http://cipm.ncsu.edu/saaesd/guard-do/minutes/03-04.htm The 5-year budget for this NRSP can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm. Criteria for approval of an NRSP are described in the NRSP Review Form.

Action Requested:

Agenda Item S1.
Approval of Agenda, Minutes and Interim Actions

Presenter: Greg Weidemann

Background: The following items will be presented:

  • Appointed Mary Duryea, (FL) as southern representative to the ESCOP Communications & Marketing Committee.
  • Appointed Mark Henry, (SC) as southern representative to the SRDC Technical & Operational Advisory Committee.
  • Appointed Tom Klindt, (TN) to serve another four-year term as southern representative on the Multistate Research Committee.
  • Extended Tom Klindt’s, (TN) term as southern representative on the ESCOP Budget & Legislative Committee by one year.
  • Appointed Richard Jones, (FL) to serve a one-year term on the SAAESD Leadership Award Committee.
  • Appointed Jerry Cherry, (GA) to serve a one-year term on the SAAESD Leadership Award Committee.
  • Appointed Steve Leath, (NC) as representative to the Joint Cotton Breeding Advisory Committee.
  • Appointed Steve Leath, (NC) as representative to the Tecoman Cotton Winter Nursery Steering Committee for an indefinite period.
  • Appointed William Brown, (FL) to serve another two-year term as southern representative on ESCOP’s Science and Technology Committee.
  • Appointed Rick Roeder, (AR) to serve a two-year term as southern representative on ESCOP’s Partnership Committee.
  • Appointed Susan Barefoot, (SC) to serve a two-year term as southern representative on ESCOP’s Partnership Committee.
  • Extended Gerald Jubb’s, (VA) term as southern representative on the ESCOP Planning Committee by one year.
  • Appointed Jim Rakocy, (VI) as Administrative Advisor to SERA-IEG-09, “Aquatic Food Animals from Warm Water Aquaculture.”
  • Appointed Clarence Watson, (MS) as Administrative Advisor to S-1011, “Water Quality Methodology for Crop Protection Chemicals.”
  • Approved DC-305 “Enhancing Reproductive Efficiency of Poultry” to write replacement project for S-285; Jerry Cherry, Administrative Advisor.
  • Approved DC-306 “Improved Systems for Management of Economically-Important Arthropod Pests Attacking Pecan” to write replacement project for S-293; Frank Gilstrap, Administrative Advisor.
  • Approved IEG-013 “Statisticians Group” until 2008.
  • Approved IEG-040 “Genetics & Breeding of Southern Forest Trees” until 2008.
  • Approved SERA-IEG-005 “Sweet Potato Collaborators Conference” for one year and an additional four years pending revisions.
  • Approved SERA-IEG-018 “Rice Technical Workers Group” for one year and an additional four years pending revisions.
  • Approved SERA-IEG-017 “Minimizing Agricultural Phosphorus Run-off Losses for Protection of the Water Resource” until 2008.
  • Approved SERA-IEG-007 “Biology and Management of Peanut Insects and Other Arthropods”(IEG-23) until 2008.
  • Approved SERA-IEG-014 “Development and Evaluation of Bunch and Muscadine Grapes for Fresh Market, Juice, Wine and Other Products” for one year and an additional four years pending revisions.
  • Appointed Lisa Collins (KY) as Administrative Advisor to S-298 “Assessing Impacts of Welfare Reform on Individual, Family, and Community Well-Being in the Rural South.”
  • Appointed Bob Shulstad (GA) as Administrative Advisor to S-1002 “New Technologies for the Utilization of Textile Materials”.
  • Appointed Roger Crickenberger (NC) as Administrative Advisor to SERA-IEG-05 “Sweet Potato Collaborators Conference”.
  • Appointed David Boethel (LA) as Administrative Advisor to SERA-IEG-018 “Rice Technical Workers Group”.
  • Appointed Roland Mote (TN) as Administrative Advisor to AC05 “Agricultural Engineering”.
  • Appointed Mark Hussey (TX) as Administrative Advisor to S-303 “Biological Control of Arthropod Pests and Weeds”.
  • Appointed Clarence Watson (MS) as Administrative Advisor to DC 306 “Improved Systems for Management of Economically-Important Arthropod Pests Attacking Pecan”.
  • Appointed Greg Weidemann (AR) as southern representative to the ESCOP Budget & Legislative Committee for a two- year term.
  • Appointed David Morrison (LA) as southern representative to the ESCOP Planning Committee for a two- year term.
  • Appointed Richard Jones(FL) as southern representative on the NRSP Review Committee.

Action Requested: Approval of agenda, minutes, and interim actions.

Action Taken: Fall, 2003 Minutes approved (Coston/Arkin), and Interim Actions approved (Coston/Arkin).

Agenda Item S2a.
NRSP-3

Presenter: Jerry Arkin

Background:
Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the budget for the remaining four years of NRSP 3 (The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The renewal proposal for this NRSP was approved in 2003 as a five-year project, but only the first budget year was approved. The remaining 4-year budget for NRSP 3 can be found at http://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm.

Action Requested:

In meeting comments:
· This is a long-term program that’s been here for 25 years and is a 1st class operation.
· The 5-year budget has changed since we first submitted our 5-year renewal proposal.
· NRSP-3 incurred a decrease in FY03 to $112,029 form $112,762
· Skip Judd commented on how great the web site looked.
· Over ½ million hits on web site as of today
· Richard Jones asked if there was any information about the data and who uses it or looks at it

Action Taken: none

 

Agenda Item S2b.
NRSP-5

Presenter: D.C. Coston

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the budget for the remaining four years of NRSP 5 (National Program for Controlling Virus Diseases of Temperate Fruit Tree Crops) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The renewal proposal for this NRSP was approved in 2003 as a five-year project, but only the first budget year was approved. The remaining 4-year budget for NRSP 5 can be found at http://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm.

Action Requested:

In meeting comments:
· First year of 5 year cycle
· Recommendation to shift cost of program to no-off-the-top funding
· No citrus crops included

Action Taken: none

 

Agenda Item S2c.
NRSP-8

Presenter: Jerry Cherry

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the budget for the remaining four years of NRSP 8 (National Animal Genome Research Program) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The renewal proposal for this NRSP was approved in 2003 as a five-year project, but only the first budget year was approved. The remaining 4-year budget for NRSP 8 can be found at http://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm.

Action Requested:

In meeting comments:
· Have asked for budget increase
· NRSP-8 Committee has voted to add aquaculture
· Group agreed that adding aquaculture may or may not increase budget

Action taken: none

Agenda Item S3.
NRSP One –Year Budget Request

NRSP-6

Presenter: Bob Westerman

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the final year’s budget for NRSP 6 (Inter-Regional Potato Introduction Project) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

This NRSP terminates September 31, 2005 and therefore only the fifth-year budget needs to be approved. The final year’s budget for NRSP 6 can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm.

Action Requested:

In meeting comments:
· Requested five year funding – 165 Thousand for salary increases
· Ask that at least a 3% increase for salaries in FY 2005 to redress recent attrition
· Project will be reviewed in June in preparation for renewal in Oct ’05

Action taken: none

Agenda Item S4a.
NRSP-1

Presenter: Bill Brown

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the NRSP 1 renewal proposal (Research Planning Using the Current Research Information System) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The NRSP 1 renewal proposal can be viewed at http://cipm.ncsu.edu/saaesd/guard-do/minutes/minutes.htm The 5-year budget for this NRSP can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm. Criteria for approval of an NRSP are described in the NRSP Review Form.

Action Requested:

In meeting comments:
· A lot of activity in the next year in NRSP-1
· Ted Bower has been reassign
· Budget increase of 4% for salaries
· 7% operating dollars
· What is happening with the modification of CRIS to accommodate extension activities and what is ECOP’s position?

Action taken: none

Agenda Item S4b.
NRSP-4

Presenter: Mary Duryea

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the NRSP 4 renewal proposal (High Value Specialty Crop Pest Management) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The NRSP 4 renewal proposal can be viewed at http://cipm.ncsu.edu/saaesd/guard-do/minutes/03-04.htm The 5-year budget for this NRSP can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm. Criteria for approval of an NRSP are described in the NRSP Review Form.

Action Requested:

Action taken: none

Agenda Item S4c.
NRSP-7

Presenter: Garry Adams

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the NRSP 7 renewal proposal (A National Agricultural Program for Minor Use Animal Drugs) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The NRSP 7 renewal proposal can be viewed at http://cipm.ncsu.edu/saaesd/guard-do/minutes/03-04.htm The 5-year budget for this NRSP can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm. Criteria for approval of an NRSP are described in the NRSP Review Form.

Action Requested:

In meeting comments:
· No off-the top funding

Action taken: none

Agenda Item S5.
S-009: Report and Budget Request

Presenter: Jerry Arkin

Background:

MULTISTATE RESEARCH PROJECT S-009
PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND UTILIZATION

ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR YEAR 2003

HIGHLIGHTS
o A total of 50,995 accessions (over 40,000 in S-009 region) were distributed to users worldwide in 2003. This is the greatest number of accessions ever distributed from Griffin in a single year. Program visibility has increased by curators attendance at CGC and National meetings, increasing requests for genetic resources.

o Over 75% of the U.S. sweetpotato collection maintained in tissue culture is backed up at Ft. Collins, CO, in 2003. Previously, there was no off-site backup of this clonal collection.

o A 100′ x 60′ machine shed was purchased to house field equipment that had previously been exposed to the weather.

o ARS provided temporary funding increases for moveable storage shelves ($45,000) to maximize seed storage space in the -18 C cold room and for an HPLC ($57,000) to evaluate genetic variability in concentration of phytochemicals with nutritional and pharmaceutical value in the collection.

o S-009 project was written, peer reviewed, and accepted for renewal for 10 years (2003 to 2013).

SUMMARY

Genetic resources representing 908 new accessions were received, increasing the total collection maintained at the Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit (PGRCU) to 83,415 accessions. The new introductions represented a broad range of 6 families, 17 genera, and 45 species from 76 countries. A total of 5,350 accessions were requested for regeneration from S-9. These included field and greenhouse seed increases of over 2,700 sorghum accessions to be regenerated in Puerto Rico and St. Croix.

In 2003, there were 548 orders processed containing 50,995 accessions (in-vitro, plants, rhizomes, seeds, canes) with 10.3% (5,244 accessions) of the accessions being supplied to foreign requesters. A total of 40,571 U.S. distributions were sent to users in the S-9 region. More than 3,225 items were shipped to the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation (NCGRP, formerly NSSL) in Ft. Collins for long-term storage or backup. Overall, 87.2% of the collection has been backed up at NCGRP (up from 72.7% in FY00). Prior to 2002, the sweetpotato tissue culture collection was not backed up at another location. Currently, 542 sweetpotato accessions or 75.3% of the sweetpotato collection are backed up in Ft. Collins.

Demand for genetic resources maintained at Griffin has greatly increased in the last few years (Fig. 1). In 1992-1999, an average of 13,500 accessions of all crops maintained at Griffin were sent each year to customers worldwide upon request. In the last four years, demand has increased to an average of 36,600 accessions requested each year with more than 50,000 accessions requested for the first time in 2003. Demand for sorghum, the largest of the national seed collections maintained at Griffin, has increased from 3,400 seed samples each year in 1992-1999 to 21,600 seed samples each year in 2000-2003.

More than 308,000 records were created and 136,000 records were modified by site personnel to enhance the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN) database. These figures include morphological, disease, insect, germination, and seed weight data not previously in GRIN for a number of accessions. Relinkage of duplicates, addition and correction of passport data was continued on the Meridian, MS, sweet sorghum collection which had not previously been entered into GRIN.

Accessions distributed by PGRCU were utilized in a vast array of research studies throughout the the S-9 region and the world. Each year it is noted that a number of accessions are used by people in research outside of traditional plant breeding. Requests come from scientists in
agronomy, genetics, molecular biology, plant pathology, entomology, botany, anthropology, archeology, medical fields, pharmaceutical, nutritional, ecology, homeland security, energy, animal science, artistic, and aquatic areas.

Regeneration and characterization was conducted during the past year for a number of crops. Watermelon regeneration was conducted on 120 accessions in pollination cages with bees. A total of 765 accessions of cultivated peanuts were grown for increase at the Bledsoe Research Farm. Quarantine peanut lines were increased in the greenhouse including 28 accessions of peanut germplasm collected during a plant exploration trip to Paraguay in 2003. Seed was produced for 50 cowpea accessions in the greenhouse and 130 cowpea accessions in the field. An additional 50 accessions were increased by cooperators at Isabela, Puerto Rico. Fifty chile pepper accessions were increased in the field at Griffin. A total of 700 accessions comprising the in vitro sweetpotato collection were regenerated in tissue culture in growth chambers with backups sent to Ft. Collins during normal regeneration. There were 68 annual clovers and 213 misc. legumes, grasses, and new crops that were regenerated in the field and greenhouse.

A collection of 350 chile pepper accessions was grown in Griffin and characterized for 26 morphological descriptors. In response to a request by the Pepper CGC, digital photographs were made of all 350 accessions and uploaded into GRIN. Digital images of whole plants, flowers, fruit, and/or seeds were also taken for Vigna, grass, bamboo, and watermelon accessions for inclusion into GRIN.

Further information on accomplishments of the S-9 Multistate Research Project for this year and previous years can be found in annual reports and minutes at the web site (http://www.ars-grin.gov/ars/SoAtlantic/ Griffin/pgrcu/s9.html).

SUMMARY OF CURRENT PROGRESS AND PROJECTED PLANS FOR 2004
The USDA-ARS base funding for the PGRCU was increased $349,370 in FY01 and $225,000 in FY02. There was no increase in permanent funding by USDA-ARS in the last two years. In FY03, USDA-ARS provided $45,000 in temporary funds to purchase moveable storage shelves to maximize storage space in the -18 C cold room and $57,000 for an HPLC to evaluate genetic variation for phytochemical concentration in genetic resources.

The PGRCU has the responsibility to acquire, characterize, maintain, evaluate, document, and distribute genetic resources of agricultural and horticultural crops; most of which are grown in the southern U.S. The long-term goal of the PGRCU plant germplasm collection is to conserve the complete range of genetic variability in crops of interest and their wild relatives, rather than just trying to obtain the maximum number of accessions. Germplasm collections can no longer afford to maintain duplicate or redundant accessions because of the risk of losing more valuable, unique accessions.

Funds are being used to support this core mission and long-term goal in a number of ways. Numerous equipment, supply, and personnel (see personnel section) additions have improved the efficiency and productivity of the Unit. The last few reports have highlighted the increase in operating budgets for each curator, additional summer temporary labor, additional technicians, seed processing facility improvements with 6 workstations and central dust collection system, backup generator for sweetpotato collection, and initiation of a germination laboratory to conduct germination tests on all accessions in the collection. This year the moveable storage shelves have increased our seed storage capacity in the -18 C cold room, the HPLC has increased genetic resources evaluation capabilities, seed thresher was purchased, and new lights were installed in seed processing area. Facilities have been upgraded with a new machine shed to provide secure storage and reduce weather damage to equipment, new shingles on the seed processing building, replaced gravel and reset benches on the warm-season grass greenhouse, and replaced greenhouse roofing panels and screens. Two security assessments were conducted in 2003 and security improvements are being implemented as finances permit.

Members of the PGRCU have been attending meetings and actively interacting with users and customers. During the past three years, the Research Leader has attended all Crop Germplasm Committee (CGC) meetings of crops maintained at Griffin including meetings on sorghum, peanut, clover, forage and turf grass, new crops, pepper, cowpea, sweetpotato, cucurbits, and watermelon. Specific crop curators have also attended their CGC and national commodity meetings. It continues to be a priority for the PGRCU to be represented at each CGC and national commodity meeting for crops maintained at Griffin to facilitate open communication and exchange of scientific information on plant genetic resources with our users.

PGRCU has continued to work on improving the maintenance of the collection by splitting samples. The bulk of each accession will be maintained in freezer storage at -18 C and a distribution sample to handle expected requests for the next 5 years will be maintained at 4 C.
In 2003, 8,307 inventory samples were split between -18 C and 4 C. An additional technician hired in 2003 concentrates on splitting samples of all accessions to retain better seed quality by maintaining the bulk of the accessions in -18 C.

Regeneration of accessions to produce fresh, high-quality seed continues each year. In 2003, the number of accessions to be increased by each curator has been increased. Presently over 2,100 sorghum accessions are growing in Puerto Rico and St. Croix for regeneration of sorghum accessions known to be of poor quality or have low seed quantities. Accessions of other species will be regenerated during the next year at Griffin and Byron, GA, (or at other locations) including cowpeas (220 accessions), cultivated peanuts (875), watermelon (108), peppers (90), squash (30), cucurbits (10), finger millet (750), grasses (190), misc. legumes and new crops (500), and annual clovers (94). All 700 sweetpotato accessions maintained in tissue culture will be regenerated next year.

SUMMARY OF PERSONNEL ACTIONS

During 2003, nine federal positions and two S-009 positions were filled due to replacement, retirement, or new hires. The federal hires were a molecular geneticist (Dr. Ming Li Wang), an agronomist and warm-season grass curator (Dr. Melanie Newman), a molecular biologist/support scientist (Dr. Noelle Barkley), a secretary, an administrative technician, and four technicians. Two state S-009 technicians were hired. Already in 2004, one federal technician has been hired. A federal computational biologist is the only current vacant position.

Presently, there are 30 federal employees and 6 state employees in the program. Some S-009 positions have not been replaced in order to fund 16 temporary state part-time and full-time positions that are employed as needed during critical work periods. The addition of Dr. Wang as the lead scientist in the molecular laboratory is a key addition to the Unit’s research on genetic analysis of plant germplasm through the use of molecular markers. Dr. Newman will specialize on the warm-season grass germplasm collection to improve the content and quality of this collection in areas including forage, turf, and native grasses.

USDA-ARS PGRCU BUDGET SITUATION AND OUTLOOK

Distribution of genetic resources continues at a high level. This is a welcome problem, as genetic resources are maintained in storage to be used and the genetic resources at Griffin are being used in greater numbers than ever before (Fig. 1). This large number of requests delays progress in some areas of seed maintenance, such as splitting seed samples, since the same people conduct seed distribution and seed storage functions. Our priority is prompt seed distribution in order to prevent delays in research progress by our users. We continue to make every attempt to respond to the needs of our customers as we are financially able. Obviously, federal and state budgets are tight and little change is expected in the immediate future. With the mission critical status of our Unit to American agriculture, improvements in physical security will be completed to preserve our genetic resources for use by scientists of today and of future generations.

REQUESTS

Maintain the S-009 FY04 budget at the same level as FY03 ($395,643). Any increase in state salaries for FY04 that may be enacted (2% proposed) would be absorbed by operations budget.

 

MULTISTATE RESEARCH PROJECT S-009

PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND UTILIZATION

 

FUNDING REQUEST FOR FY2005

TO THE

SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF

STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION DIRECTORS

 

BUDGET

 

  1. S-9:

REQUESTED

 FY2003                      FY2004                       FY2005

Personnel                     $343,457                     $318,917                   $304,095

Travel                                 1,000                           1,000                         1,000

Operations                       48,186                         72,726                       83,948

Equipment                          3,000                           3,000                        6,600

                                                                                         

TOTAL                       $395,643                     $395,643                    $395,643

 

 

 

  1. USDA/ARS

 FY2003                      FY2004                        FY2005

Personnel                     $1,527,297              $1,591,600                  $1,615,474b

Travel                                  20,000                      20,000                         20,000

Indirect Research Cost/

Other Services              236,945                  296,598                       306,000

RSA support                        5,000                              0                                  0

Operation                          218,622                    180,541                       151,265

Equipment                         136,500a                   19,800                         15,000

Building and Field

Maintenance/Support   58,612                     60,540                         61,340

                                                                                         

TOTAL                       $2,202,976                  $2,169,079                  $2,169,079

 

a           Includes $45,000 in temporary funding for moveable storage shelves and $57,000 in temporary funding for HPLC.

b           Includes an average 1.5% projected increase in salaries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Action Requested: Send a one-page report to Southern Region ED for him to send out to directors to help promote S-009 project

Action taken: S-009 budget was approved on motion/second by Drs. Arkin/Judd.

Agenda Item S6.
Proposal for new NRSP

Presenter: Bill Brown (FL)

Background:

Each SAES region is responsible for reviewing the new NRSP proposal (National Initiative for Animal Environmental Stewardship) and submitting recommendations to the NRSP Review Committee at the conclusion of their spring meetings.

The new NRSP proposal can be viewed at http://www.wisc.edu/ncra/AnimalWasteProposal.doc. The budget for the new NRSP Proposal can be found athttp://www.wisc.edu/ncra/2004NRSPbudgets.htm. Criteria for approval of an NRSP are described in the NRSP Review Form

Action Requested:

In meeting comments:

  • Proposal to develop a new NRSP from a national center that has been supported by a grant, which ends January, 2005
    · 5-year budget is 1.4 million / 270,000 a year and this supports the following:
    Director
    Asst. Director
    Office support
    Web tech
    Travel
    Newsletter
    Materials & supplies

Action taken: Questions were raised during discussion on the new NRSP:
Is this a NRSP and if so what other ones do we have to compare this to?
What are other sources of funding?
What is being done on the web site to serve as a clearinghouse?
Is this an important NRSP?
Comments and questions will go to the NRSP Review Committee this summer.

 

Agenda Item S7.
Executive Director’s Report

Presenter: Eric Young

Background: Eric Young, Executive Director, will report on some of his activities at the regional and national level not covered in other agenda items.

In-meeting report:
Click here for ED’s annual report distributed at meeting.

Action Requested: For information only

Action Taken: none

 

Agenda Item S8.
Southern Rural Development Center Report

Presenter: Bo Beaulieu

Background:

The Rural Sociological Society has just released a new book that is itled, “Challenges for Rural America in the 21st Century.” The 30 chapter book presents a host of topics that relate to the well being of rural people and communities. Most importantly, it presents a series of policy recommendations that are worthy of consideration by policymakers, other leaders, and citizens who want to bring hope to rural people in America.

One of the two editors of the book, Lou Swanson, has agreed to attend the meeting and provide highlights of the book. The SRDC Director, Bo Beaulieu, will offer my thoughts about a Southern regional response to these issues and then our hope is to open it up for discussion among the Research Directors.

Action Requested:

 

Action Taken: none

 

Agenda Item S9.
SAAESD Leadership Award Presentation

Presenter: Greg Weidemann

Background:
Greg Weidemann, SAAESD Chair, will present the annual SAAESD Leadership Award.

Action Requested:

Action Taken: Drs. William H. Brown, LSU, and Charles J. Scifres, Texas A&M were presented SAAESD Leadership Awards.

 

Agenda Item S10.
Report from Chief Operating Officers Meeting

Presenter: Greg Weidemann

Background:
Greg Weidemann, SAAESD Chair, will report on items discussed and actions taken at the Chief Operating Officers meeting held earlier this morning.

 In meeting report:
· Greg Weidemann reported that the Southern Region is operating in the Black
· Eric was commended for a job well done.

Action Requested: None, for information only.

 

Agenda Item S11.
MRC Report

Presenter: Bill Brown (FL)

Background:

The following items will be discussed.

  1. Proposed process change to enter Development Committee and IEG/SERA requests directly into NIMSS Appendix A or B and drop SAAESD Request for Action form. Please click here to download a table outlining the process for developing a MRF project, IEG, or SERA.
  2. Unified naming system for multistate activities proposed by the regional Executive Directors to improve communication and reduce confusion between regions relative to multistate activity types. Below is the proposed nomenclature and a description of the activity.

Approved by CSREES, with expected outcomes:

Multistate Research Projects (NC, S, W, NE) – Projects that are potentially funded in part by Hatch Multistate Research Funds (MRF); involve integrated, potentially interdisciplinary, and multistate activities; have expected outcomes; convey knowledge; and are formally approved by CSREES.

500 Series (NC-5xx, S-5xx, W-5xx, NE-5xx) – Committees formed, for a maximum of two years, to provide a mechanism for response to acute crises, emergencies, and opportunities using the multistate research approach and may be funded by MRF. Activities may range from formally organized research on targeted objectives to very informal research coordination or information exchange activity, depending on the circumstances; have expected outcomes; convey knowledge; and are formally approved by CSREES.

National Research Support Project (NRSP) – Activities that focuses on the development of enabling technologies, support activities (such as to collect, assemble, store, and distribute materials, resources and information), or the sharing of facilities needed to accomplish high priority research, but which is not of itself primarily research; formally approved by CSREES.

Not approved by CSREES, but with expected outcomes:

Coordinating Committees (CC) – Activities that provide a mechanism for addressing critical regional issues where multistate coordination is appropriate within a function (ie. research, education or extension); have expected outcomes; convey knowledge; but are not formally approved by CSREES.

Education/Extension and Research Activity (ERA) – Activities that serve to integrate education (academic and extension) and research on a particular topic; have expected outcomes; convey knowledge; but are not formally approved by CSREES.

Not approved by CSREES, with primary focus on information exchange or advisory:

Information Exchange Groups (IEG) – Activities that bring together faculty/staff to exchange information on a particular topic; not formally approved by CSREES.

Advisory Committees (AC) – Committees of department chairs/heads that exchange information on their particular discipline and may serve to review multistate projects; not formally approved by CSREES.

Not approved by CSREES, primary focus on development of long-term multistate activity:

Development Committee (DC) – Committees of duration less than two years for the purpose of developing a Multistate Research Activity, IEG, ERA, CC, or 500 Series; not formally approved by CSREES.

  1. MRC actions
  • Projects approved by the MRC and CSREES:
  • S-9, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation and Utilization (S-009) – Jerry Arkin, AA
    · S-1016, Impacts of Trade and Domestic Policies on the Competitiveness and Performance of Southern Agriculture (S-287) – Tom Klindt, AA
  • Projects pending approval by the MRC and CSREES (DCs approved):
  • DC-304, Fruit and Vegetable Supply-Chain Management, Innovations, and Competitiveness (S-222) – Bob Shulstad, AA
    · DC-305, Enhancing Reproductive Efficiency of Poultry (S-285) – Jerry Cherry, AA
    · DC-306, Improved Systems for Management of Economically Important Arthropod Pests Attacking Pecan (S-293) – Clarence Watson, AA
    · DC-307, Postharvest Quality and Safety in Fresh-cut Vegetables and Fruits (S-294) – Bill Brown, AA
    · DC-308, Systems for Controlling Air Pollutant Emissions and Indoor Environments of Poultry, Swine & Dairy Facilities (S-291) – Jerry Cherry, AA
  • New Projects pending approval by the MRC and CSREES (DCs approved):
  • DC-302, Irrigation Management for Humid and Sub-humid Areas – Jerry Arkin, AA
    · DC-303, Production, Harvest, Storage, and Delivery of Herbaceous Energy Crops – Skip Jubb, AA
  • Projects terminating 9/30/04 without pending DC requests:
  • S-289, Factors Associated with Genetic & Phenotypic Variation in Poultry: Molecular to Populational – Jerry Cherry, AA
    · S-290, Technical & Economical Efficiencies of Producing, Marketing, and Managing Environmental Plants – D.C. Coston, AA
    · S-292, The Poultry Food System: A Farm to Table Model – Jerry Cherry, AA

Action Requested: Approval of the process change for requesting new or replacement multistate activities and approval of the unified multistate activities nomenclature.

Action taken: Modification in procedure for submitting a request to establish a Development Committee was approved.
Regional ED’s are still working on the common nomenclature for multistate activities and will bring the final version to the MRC for approval this summer.

 

Agenda Item S12.
Expertise and Field Research Mapping Project

Presenter: Jay Ritchie and Eric Young

Background:
Eric Young and Jay Richie (Monitor Lab, Social Science Research Center, MS State Univ.) will demonstrate the recently completed interactive spreadsheet of faculty expertise, which includes SAAESD member institutions, 1890 institutions, and 1862 institutions from bordering states. (Click here to see the Expertise Spreadsheet) Also, they will demonstrate a new web site that will create maps of the outlying research stations in the Southern Region based on the commodities or other subjects of investigation that are being studied at that station (ie. cotton, rice, cattle, hogs, etc.). Use of these tools to facilitate multistate collaborations will be discussed.

Action Requested: Request to include ARS into Expertise database and to send outlying research station spreadsheet to each State’s Director for clean up.

Action Taken: none

 

Agenda Item S13.
Open Discussion on Multistate Collaboration and Regionalization

Presenter:

Background:
Eric Young will start this discussion on multistate collaborations with a brief presentation outlining some of the incentives for collaboration and general characteristics of successful ones, particularly related to shared faculty positions. Please click here to download a copy of the presentation. Directors will be asked to share their thoughts and experiences on various types of multistate collaborations and examples of current collaborations.

Action Requested: For, information only.

Action Taken: none

Agenda Item J12.
Potential LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) project on Mississippi River Basin

Presenter: Daryl Lund

Background: Given that this is the first joint meeting between our two regions in some time, it seemed like a good opportunity to explore potential issues of mutual interest. One that comes to mind is the Mississippi River basin since what is done in the North Central Region clearly affects what happens in the Southern Region. As a result I have investigated the potential for a long-term ecological research project (LTER) for the Mississippi River. I will present the information in the following power point and ask for suggested next steps.

Click here for Powerpoint presentation

Action Requested: For information only.

  Agenda Item J13.
Obesity Initiative

Presenter: Daryl Lund

 

Background:

Recently I had the opportunity to assist in organizing a workshop on the research needs/gaps in understanding and combating obesity. Needless to say this is a hot topic. The secretary of HHS just announced a major new initiative on obesity through NIH, and CSREES just released its white paper on obesity, seeking your input. One of the participants at the workshop was Etta Saltos, National Program Leader, Human Nutrition Competitive Programs, CSREES, USDA, who is also a primary contact on the CSREES white paper (Drs. Susan Welsh (swelsh(ja),csrees.usda.gov) and Etta Saltos (esaltos(S),csrees.usda.gov). Following the workshop, Etta contacted me about the possibility of initiating a multistate research project on obesity and sent me the following description:

Overweight and obesity have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 40 of adults (69 million) will be obese by 2010 if trends go unchanged. In the past 20 years, the percentage of children who are overweight has doubled from 7 to 15, while the percentage of adolescents who are overweight has almost tripled from 5 to 16. Notable disparities exist among racial, ethnic and economically disadvantaged groups which are the primary groups served by USDAs food and nutrition assistance programs. A new intense focus is needed to find the salient behavioral factors that lead to obesity including biologically-determined behavioral predispositions, such as taste and sensory specific satiety; experience with food including physiological and social conditioning; intra-personal factors, such as attitudes, self-identity and self-efficacy; inter-personal factors, such as social and cultural norms; and environmental factors including the physical, social, economic, and informational environment. A multistate project on obesity prevention is needed to link researchers and Extension personnel in the university system to provide a coordinated, integrated approach to addressing this complex issue.

Follow-up: The NCRA Multistate Research Committee met March 11 and at that meeting the potential to develop an NC project on obesity was considered. It was decided that I would contact the directors of agricultural experiment stations to determine the interest of investigators and faculty to participate in a potential project on obesity. I sent a memo to the directors on March 16, and this is a report of the subsequent response.

CSREES Obesity Initiative: On March 4, Mark Poth, Deputy Administrator of the Competitive Grants Programs, CSREES, sent an email to all directors with attachments that included a covering memo from Gary Cunningham announcing an Obesity White Paper by CSREES and the white paper outlining the current and proposed activities within the CSREES portfolio and instructions to respond to Etta Saltos and Susan Welsh with comments. Following is an analysis of the contents of the white paper.

The white paper was positioned to complement the President’s initiative “Healthier US” and “Healthy People 2010”. It suggested that CSREES would contribute to a decrease in obesity through an initiative entitled, “Partnership Obesity Initiative.” This initiative would coordinate increased, directed funding toward research, academic programs and extension. The components of the program would be: (1) behavioral factors and intervention strategies, (2) educational outreach through a new” Obesity Prevention Competitive Grants Program” building on CES programs, and (3) focus on low income families and children through EFNEP.

Specific funding opportunities were identified for:

Research:
NRI section on “Human Nutrition and Obesity.” First awards were in 2003
Coordinated Agricultural Program (CAP) – large grants (up to $5M) multiyear.
Section on “Improving Food Quality” – expand to include obesity
Small Business Innovation Research -include obesity grants

Extension:
Proposed a CES “Obesity Prevention Competitive Grants Program”
Expand EFNEP to focus on obesity
Develop “Community Foods Projects Competitive Grants Program” to include obesity

Higher Education:
Proposed a “Higher Education Competitive Grants Program” to include obesity
Expand “Multidisciplinary Graduate Education and Training Scholarships” for obesity

CSREES also provided a table with information from CRIS and all grants within CSREES that have some focus on obesity. The following data were extracted from the table: NRI – 31 projects; IFAFS – 7; Multistate Research Funds – 3; Special – 3; Hatch – 49; SBIR – 1; National Needs Graduate Fellowships – 1; Multicultural Scholars – 1; Challenge Grants – 1; and Extension -4.

Results of Contacts with Experiment Station Directors:

The following responded positively to the idea of forming an NC project on obesity-

Etta Saltos CSREES
Susan Welsh CSREES
Connie Weaver Purdue
Sue Shapses Rutgers
Nancy Betts Nebraska
Beth Olson Michigan State
Ray Jussaume Washington State University
Cornelia Flora Iowa State University
Marjorie Fitch University of Arkansas
Jerold Foote University of Arkansas
Rachel Johnson University of Vermont
Sharon Fleming Berkeley
Joanne Ikeda Berkeley
Pat Crawford Berkeley

Conclusion:
It would appear that there is sufficient interest in forming an NC project on obesity or at least tying the subject onto an existing NC or W project (NC-219 entitled “Using Stage-Based Interventions to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Young Adults”; W-1003 “Parent and Household Influences on Calcium Intake Among Preadolescents”; or NC 1001 “System Analyses of the Relationships of Agriculture and Food Systems to Community Health”).

Action Taken: Daryl Lund will forward Mark Poth’s email to the SAES directors.

Agenda Item J14.
Research highlights from Auburn

Presenter: John Jensen

Background:

Three Auburn faculty will present summaries of their research programs to highlight some of the agricultural research efforts underway at Auburn University serving the needs of Alabama and the Southern region.

Speakers talking about Auburn Research:

“Big Science in the Genomics Era: How the Catfish Genome Project Fits”
Dr. John Liu, Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures

“Poultry Products Safety & Quality Peaks of Excellence Program”
Dr. Pat Curtis, Department of Poultry Science

“Turfgrass Research at Auburn University”
Dr. Beth Guertal, Department of Agronomy and Soils

Action Requested: None, for information only.

 

  Agenda Item S14.
Southern Region IPM Policy Committee Report

Presenter: David Boethel

Background:

Over 90 letters of intent were submitted and 61 proposals were received for the Southern Region IPM Competitive Grant Program. The peer panel met in December 2003 at the Southern Region IPM Center, Raleigh, NC, to evaluate the proposals. Nine of the submissions were extension proposals, the remainder were research proposals, with no joint research/extension proposals. Four extension proposals, all dealing with IPM in the schools, were funded at the level of $151,161. Ten research proposals were funded at the level of $683,836. The funds available for FY 2004, the current funding year, were reduced by 10% for research projects and 10.5% for extension projects. All reviews of the proposals were sent back to the PIs within two weeks of the peer panel review.

To enhance the function, activities, and processes of the Southern Region IPM Center, an RFA soliciting proposals for projects has been released. Three types of projects are being requested – (1) state contact projects, (2) crop profiles and pest management strategic plans, and (3) special projects. The deadline for receipt of proposals is April 30, 2004. Approximately $600,000 is available to fund projects in the three areas designed to meet the goals described in the “National Roadmap for Integrated Pest Management.”

Action Requested: For Information only.

Action Taken: none

Agenda Item S15.
Cotton Winter Nursery Initiative

Presenter: Chuck Onstad and Eric Young

Background:

The mission of the Cotton Winter Nursery (CWN) at Tecoman, Mexico is to ensure that new and unique germplasm is available to cotton breeders in a timely manner, that the cotton germplasm is characterized and evaluated, and that the information is publicly available. CWN’s two primary goals are:
1. Expand the genetic diversity of US cottons. The cotton germplasm collection represents the source from which the US Upland cotton varieties originated; yet these varieties represent only about 1% of the potential genetic variability.
2. Characterize primitive germplasm to provide directed evaluation and selection of improved traits. Disease and pest resistance, smooth leaf, nectariless, glandless, stress resistance, boll types, and early maturity were derived from the primitive germplasm. Rigorous evaluations are needed to improve or expand these desirable traits for commercial cotton improvement.

Current CWN usage is about 1/3 each SAES faculty, ARS scientists, and industry. The number of users averages around 30 and the nursery plantings are approximately 3 to 4 acres out of the 8 acres available. Most of the current cotton varieties grown have origins of material grown and evaluated at CWN. In addition, the National Cotton Germplasm Collection is dependent on CWN for increase and distribution of its material.

CWN is located on a large INIFAP research station and since its beginnings has operated on user fees managed through a dedicated account at National Cotton Council. Beginning in the late 1990s, the nursery has experienced chronic budget short falls due to a reduction in user numbers in the mid-90s. This resulted primarily from industry consolidation and subsequent establishment of a private winter nursery. Annual subsidies from the ARS cotton improvement program at Texas A&M and Cotton Inc. keep nursery operations in the black, but do not allow for unexpected equipment repair/replacement or improvements.

The earthquake in Colima last Winter has brought this tight budget situation to a critical point. The lab/storage/office building and tool shed were destroyed and the concrete surface irrigation system badly damaged. Insurance claims have rebuilt the building, but not the tool shed and did not cover the irrigation system. Due to extensive damage across the research station, the INIFAP authorities have decided to upgrade a number of their facilities, including installation of permanent drip irrigation throughout the station. These occurrences have resulted in the following immediate needs for 2004.

  1. Install drip irrigation $15,000
    2. Repair surface irrigation as backup 8,000
    3. Rebuild tool shed 2,000
    Total $25,000

Proposal – In order to meet the immediate needs and provided CWN additional support over the next five years, Dr. Chuck Onstad, ARS Southern Plains Area Director, has offered to provide half of the funds needed for 2004 and an equal amount for at least four additional years, if the Southern Directors will contribute the remaining half over the same five-year period.

Action Requested:

Approve an assessment of $12,500 per year to be provided to CWN in late summer of 2004-2008. The assessment will be based on a formula to be decided by the SAAESD Chief Operating Officers.

Action Taken: On motion/second by Cherry/Barefoot approved to contribute $12,500 each year over a five-year period. The assessment for these funds will be based on the state’s cotton acreage and collected by the ED’s office along with the regional assessment. Chuck Onstad and Mike Harrington will approach western states.

 

Agenda Item S16.
Sun Grant Project

Presenter: Tom Klindt

Background:

The Sun Grant Initiative is a program to promote research, education and outreach in the area of bio-energy and bio-product development and utilization. The program is to be administered by five regional centers – University of Tennessee, Oklahoma State University, Cornell, Oregon State University and South Dakota State University. During the current session of Congress, the Sun Grant Initiative was authorized by amendment into the Farm Bill. The authorization was for funding of $25 million, $50 million and $75 million for FY-05 through FY-07 and to remain at the latter level for some years thereafter. These funds would be equally divided among five regional centers. Centers would utilize at least 75 percent of funds for competitive grants to Land Grant Universities in respective regions.

Funds have not yet been appropriated. If and when they are, advisory councils, the exact composition of which being dependent on the region, will be formed to assist in administration of the competitive grant program. These councils will include Experiment Stations and Extension Service representatives from throughout respective regions.

Action Requested: For Information Only

Action Taken: none

 

 

Agenda Item S17.
Sun Grains Partnership Proposal

Presenter: Bill Brown (LA)

Background:

The Sun Grains proposal will be discussed. Please click here to download a copy of this proposal.

Action Requested:

Action Taken: Put this on fall agenda and discuss at that time.

 

Agenda Item S18.
Southern Forest Research Partnership

Presenter: Larry Biles, Executive Director

Background:

The Southern Forest Research Partnership, Inc. (SFRP) is a new model in cooperative forestry research. The Partnership builds on the strengths of existing cooperative research programs by reaching across organizational boundaries to attract support from broader segments of the forestry community. The Partnership’s mission is to foster collaborative relationships, public and private, that provides new and revised research knowledge to: (1) enable the southeast to remain competitive in the global forestry market, (2) enhance the forest landscape, and (3) better assure that this natural resource will be sustained indefinitely.

The imperative is clear: Meeting contemporary demands for forest products and healthy forest depends on increasing productivity while protecting the environment and sustainability of the forests. The region faces complex issues that cross property lines and political boundaries. The issues are beyond the scope of anyone organization and require the focused attention of a team of scientists with diverse backgrounds and capabilities.

Actions Requested: Know about and understand the Southern Forest Research Partnership, Inc. so Experiment Station Directors can 1. Encourage (and/or support — pay membership dues) forest resources Colleges/Schools/Departments within their institution to join and participate in the Southern Forest Research Partnership. 2. Direct request for research proposals in forest resources through the SFRP and encourage faculty of member units to be active participants. 3. To the degree possible solicit/shift leadership and/or administrative responsibilities for regional forest resources research projects to the SFRP. 4. Solicit political support for private and public funding of the SFRP within their universities, state, and federal congressional delegations.

Action Requested:

Action Taken: none

 

Agenda Item S19.
Resolutions Committee Report

Presenter: Roland Mote and Vance Watson

Background:

Resolutions in Appreciation will be offer to Dr. William H. Brown, Dr. Frank E. Gilstrap, Dr. Marty J. Fuller and to Dr. John Jensen and the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station.

Action Requested:

Action Taken: Resolutions of appreciation were read for Drs William H. Brown, Frank E. Gilstrap and Marty J. Fuller who have left the Association. A resolution of appreciation was also read for Dr. John Jenson and staff of the Alabama Agriculture Experiment Station at Auburn University for their roles in hosting the SAAESD/NCRA Spring Meeting. The resolutions were approved by a round of applause.

 

Agenda Item S20.
Announcements, Future Meeting Plans, etc.

Presenter: Greg Weidemann

Background:
The next SAAESD meeting will be Monday morning, September 27, 2004 in Oklahoma City, just prior to the Experiment Station Section Meeting and the SAES/ARD Workshop. The preliminary agenda can be accessed through a link in the Special Notices section of our home page.

2005 SAAESD Spring meeting will be hosted by Texas Agricultural Experiment Station in Texas and will be joint with ASRED. The meeting will take place in Corpus Christi, Texas at the Omni Hotel April 3-6, 2005.

Future Spring meetings:
· 2005 – Texas
· 2006 – Mississippi
· 2007 – Tennessee
· 2008 – Puerto Rico
· 2009 – Virginia
· 2010 – North Carolina

Meeting adjourned at 9:15 a.m.

Action Requested:

  Agenda Item S21.
Report of ASRED Liaison to SAAESD

 

Presenter: Chester Fehlis

Background:

In spite of small increases to educational systems in several southern region (SR) states, the increases generally have not included Extension Services. Additionally, downward budget pressures continue as legislatures work on FY05 budgets.

Budgets: Extension Services in most SR states are continuing to work on strategies to offer programs with fewer employees and less support. Most of these strategies include fewer local educators (county staff) serving larger geographical and/or subject areas. At the state level, strategies include combining and restructuring offices and units, both within and beyond Extension.

In addition, multi-state cooperation in development of educational materials is a positive aspect that continues and is being increased. The SR has taken the lead in developing a national e-Extension system that will provide an improved system and infrastructure for serving a broader audience that desires access to research-based information on a 24/7/365 basis. This initiative was formally endorsed at the National Extension Director and Administrator meeting held in late February 2004 in Phoenix. This system will be of value to all three functions of the land-grant system.

TAA: Several SR institutions have been involved with implementation of the training provisions of the Trade and Adjustment Assistance Act which provides training and minimal payments to producers who follow the TAA guidelines and can show a five-year decrease in commodity prices that are directly traceable to foreign competition.

Web-based Conferencing: SR Extension directors, following a recommendation from the Information Technology committee of the SR Program Leadership Network, have participated in a demonstration of “Centra Symposium,” a web-based conferencing system. Although, no formal proposal is on the table, it is thought that such a system may be of interest to both ASRED and SAAESD on a shared basis. Other commercial systems are also being evaluated.

Personnel Changes: Currently, retirements/resignations have left three states with acting/interim Extension directors – VPI, Florida, and Oklahoma.
ASRED Officers/ECOP Members: ASRED officers for FFY04 are Charles Norman (TN), Chair, Ivory Lyles (AR), Chair-elect; and Tim Cross (TN), secretary. ECOP members from the SR are Chester Fehlis (TX), Jon Ort (NC), and Charles Norman (TN).
Upcoming Meetings: The fall meeting of ASRED will be held August 29 – September 1, 2004 in
Biloxi, MS in conjunction with the SR Program Leadership Network.

Action Requested: For Information Only.